Breast Cancer Awareness

DID YOU KNOW?

In 2018, it’s estimated that among U.S. women and men there will be*:

Women

  • 266,120 new cases of invasive breast cancer
  • 40,920 breast cancer deaths

Men

  • 2,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer
  • 480 breast cancer deaths

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer occurs when cells divide and grow without their normal control.

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) occurs when the abnormal cells grow inside the milk ducts, but have not spread to nearby tissue. DCIS is a non-invasive breast cancer.

Invasive breast cancer occurs when cancer cells spread to nearby tissue or other parts of the body.

Invasive breast cancer that spreads to other parts of the body is called metastatic breast cancer.

*American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts and Figures 2018. Atlanta, GA: American Cancer Society, 2018.

OVERALL ESTIMATES OF BREAST CANCER IN THE U.S.

Women

In 2018, it’s estimated among U.S. women there will be [1]:

266,120 new cases of invasive breast cancer (This includes new cases of primary breast cancer, but not recurrences of original breast cancers.)

63,960 new cases of in situ breast cancer (This includes ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Of those, about 83 percent will be DCIS [2]. DCIS is a non-invasive breast cancer. LCIS is a condition that increases the risk of invasive breast cancer. Learn more about DCIS and LCIS.)

40,920 breast cancer deaths

Men

Breast cancer in men is rare, but it does happen.

In 2018, it’s estimated among U.S. men there will be [1]:

2,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer (This includes new cases of primary breast cancers, but not recurrences of original breast cancers.)

480 breast cancer deaths

Rates of breast cancer incidence (new cases) and mortality (death) are much lower among men than among women [3].

  1. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts and Figures 2018. Atlanta, GA: American Cancer Society, 2018.
  2. American Cancer Society. Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2017-2018. Atlanta, GA: American Cancer Society, 2017.
  3. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al., editors. SEER Fast Stats, 1975-2014. Incidence and mortality 2000-2014. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. http://seer.cancer.gov/faststats/, accessed January 31, 2018.

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER – BREAST CANCER SCREENING

Am I at a higher than average risk of breast cancer?

When should I begin mammography screening?

How often should I get a mammogram?

What should I do to prepare for a mammogram?

Is my mammogram scheduled at an FDA- certified mammography center? (To check on your own, visit the FDA website.)

Does the radiologist specialize in mammography?

If your provider does not perform a clinical breast exam

Would you perform a clinical breast exam today?

If you are 40-49 and your provider does not bring up mammography

Can we discuss the benefits and risks of mammography for me?

If you are at higher than average risk of breast cancer

What screening tests do you recommend for me?

If you have a physical disability

Which mammography center can accommodate my needs?

If you are pregnant

When and what type of screening is safe for my developing baby?

If you are breastfeeding

When and what type of screening should I get?

If you have breast implants

Which mammography center has experience in mammography for women with breast implants?

If you have an abnormal finding on a clinical breast exam or a mammogram

What follow-up tests will I have? Please describe these tests for me.

Questions for your mammography technologist

(Before the exam, let your technologist know if you are anxious or have any concerns. And, tell your technologist if you feel any discomfort during your mammogram.)

How long will the mammogram take?

When will I get my results?

Learn more about talking with your health care provider.

Breast Cancer Self-Awareness Messages

1, Know your Risk

– Talk to both sides of your family to learn about your family health history.

– Talk to a doctor about your risk of breast cancer.

2. Get Screened

– Talk with a doctor about which screening tests are right for you if you are at higher risk.

– Have a mammogram every year starting at age 40 if you are at average risk.

– Have a clinical breast exam at least every 3 years starting at age 20, and every year starting at age 40.

– Sign up for your screening reminder at komen.org/reminder.

3. Know what is normal for you

– See a doctor if you notice any of these breast changes

o Lump, hard knot or thickening inside the breast or underarm area

o Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening of the breast

o Change in the size or shape of the breast

o Dimpling or puckering of the skin

o Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple

o Pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast

o Nipple discharge that starts suddenly

o New pain in one spot that does not go away

4. Make healthy lifestyle choices

– Maintain a healthy weight

– Add exercise into your routine

– Limit alcohol intake

– Limit menopausal hormone use

– Breastfeed, if you can

IF YOU FIND A LUMP

If you feel a lump in your breast, try not to panic or worry.

Most lumps are not breast cancer, but something less serious, such as a benign breast condition.

Some lumps will go away on their own. In younger women, lumps are often related to menstrual periods and will go away by the end of the cycle.

However, if you find a lump (or any change in your breast or underarm area), it’s best to see your health care provider to be sure it’s not breast cancer.

Learn more about benign breast conditions.

Breast lumps or lumpiness

Many women’s breasts feel lumpy. Breast tissue naturally has a bumpy texture.

Some women have lumpier breasts than others. In most cases, this lumpiness is no cause to worry.

If the lumpiness can be felt throughout the breast and feels like your other breast, then it’s probably normal breast tissue.

Lumps that feel harder or different from the rest of the breast (or the other breast) or that feel like a change are a concern and should be checked. This type of lump may be a sign of breast cancer or a benign breast condition (such as a cyst or fibroadenoma).

See a health care provider if you:

– Find a new lump (or any change) that feels different from the rest of your breast

– Find a new lump (or any change) that feels different from your other breast

– Feel something that's different from what you felt before

If you’re unsure whether you should have a lump (or any change) checked, it’s best to see a provider.

Nipple discharge

Liquid leaking from your nipple (nipple discharge) can be troubling, but it’s rarely a sign of breast cancer.

Discharge can be your body’s natural reaction when the nipple is squeezed.

Signs of a more serious condition (such as breast cancer) include discharge that:

– Occurs without squeezing the nipple

– Occurs in only 1 breast

– Is bloody or clear (not milky)

Nipple discharge can also be caused by an infection or other condition that needs treatment.

If you have any nipple discharge, see a health care provider.

Pain in your breasts may be related to your menstrual period. However, if the pain doesn’t go away, don’t ignore it. Although pain is rarely a sign of breast cancer, it’s best to see a provider to be sure.

What to do if you don’t have a health care provider?

If you don’t have a health care provider, one of the best ways to find a good one is to get a referral from a trusted family member or friend.

If that’s not an option, call your health department, a clinic or a nearby hospital.

Don’t Forget your Screenings.

Sign up here for a screening reminder.

Adapted From – www.komen.org

 

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